Temas Especiales

02 de Jun de 2020

Nacional

US citizen murdered in front of children

Alfredo Delgado, 47, a Mexican born naturalized American was murdered by four hooded men who broke into his home to commit robbery in th...

Alfredo Delgado, 47, a Mexican born naturalized American was murdered by four hooded men who broke into his home to commit robbery in the neighborhood of La Esperanza, Alcalde Díaz.

The killing has heightened concerns among residents and visitors about the decreasing level of security in the city, and the increasingly bold moves of gangs.

The criminals poisoned the family’s Doberman dog, cut the fence that had been erected to keep delinquents at bay and ripped iron bars aside to get inside the house. When Delgado heard the noises he went to investigate and came face to face with the burglars who shot him in the head in front of his children, ages 9 and 12.

When his wife, Edith Guerra Delgado saw what had happened, she gave them her jewelry, but the criminals continued demanding money and finally took a small strongbox that, according to the survivors, was empty.

The victim’s wife managed to get her husband into one of the family’s car and took him to the San Miguel Arcángel hospital, where he was pronounced dead a few minutes after being taken to the operating room.

The Gulf War veteran arrived to Panama less than a year ago, thinking that he was going to find the peace to help him forget his battle experiences.

Instead he was killed by petty crooks looking for money.

This is just another example of the violence that is affecting the country, where insecurity is rife and foreigners and nationals alike are becoming victims of criminals.

Over the last few months, 22 tourists have been mugged by gangs of youngsters that see them as easy prey.

Last year the American socialite, Toni Grossi Abrams was kidnapped and murdered by a gang formed by Colombians and Panamanians.

Her burned, mutilated body was found inside a suitcase abandoned in the area of Parque Lefevre.

The Government and Justice Minister, Daniel Delgado Diamante recently rushed through the approval of three security bills, aimed at creating a more secure Panama, where citizens and foreigners alike will feel safe.

On the other hand, some of the measures have raised fears of a return to militarism that ruled the country during the years of dictatorship.

Levels of violence, particularly in the capital city continue to increase, often fueled by the involvement of youth gangs and organized crime in narco-trafficking.