Temas Especiales

07 de Apr de 2020

Nacional

A hotter Amazon for indigenous cultures

BRAZIL. Deforestation and global climate change are making the Amazon region drier and hotter, decimating fish stocks in this area and ...

BRAZIL. Deforestation and global climate change are making the Amazon region drier and hotter, decimating fish stocks in this area and imperiling the Kamayurá tribe’s existence. Like other small indigenous cultures around the world with little money or capacity to move, they are struggling to adapt to the changes.

Chief Kotok, who like all of the Kamayurá people goes by only one name, said that men can now fish all night without a bite in streams where fish used to be abundant; they safely swim in lakes previously teeming with piranhas. “As a chief, I have to have vision and look down the road, but I don’t know what will happen to my children and grandchildren”, he said through an interpreter.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says that up to 30 percent of animals and plants face an increased risk of extinction if global temperatures rise 2 degrees Celsius in coming decades. But anthropologists also fear a wave of cultural extinction of small indigenous groups; the loss of their traditions, arts and languages.