Temas Especiales

16 de May de 2022

Nacional

World Briefs

NEW DELHI – Police on Wednesday discovered leftover explosives hidden in a bag in Mumbai's main train station — a stunning new example o...

NEW DELHI – Police on Wednesday discovered leftover explosives hidden in a bag in Mumbai's main train station — a stunning new example of botched security after the deadly rampage that left the government open to accusations it missed warnings and bungled its response.

During a joint press conference with Condoleezza Rice, Foreign Minister Pranab Mukherjee said, "there is no doubt the terrorist attacks in Mumbai were perpetrated by individuals who came from Pakistan and whose controllers are in Pakistan."

India's defense minister summoned the army, navy and air force chiefs to warn them to be prepared for terror attacks.

The bomb squad defused the two four-kilogram (8-pound) bombs, said Assistant Commissioner of Police Bapu Domre.

BANGKOK, Thailand – The first commercial flight in a week arrived in Bangkok on Wednesday as anti-government protesters ended their siege of the country's two main airports, declaring victory after Thailand's prime minister was ousted by a court ruling.

Thousands of jubilant protesters streamed out of the Suvarnabhumi international airport in cars and trucks, while others cleaned up the mess that had accumulated during their weeklong takeover. Similar scenes were witnessed at the domestic Don Muang airport.

"See you later when the country needs us!" one of them shouted while leaving, as other protesters waved and honked.

The departure of the People's Alliance for Democracy from the airport ended the country's immediate crisis, which had severed Thailand's air links to the outside world for a week, and stranded more than 300,000 tourists.

MUSCAT, Oman – Passengers on a luxury cruise liner attacked by pirates in the dangerous waters between Yemen and Somalia said Wednesday they were surprised by the assailants' boldness.

Sunday's attack on the nearly 600-foot long M/S Nautica in the Gulf of Aden was the latest evidence that pirates have grown more aggressive, viewing almost any ship on the water as a potential target.

"We didn't think they would be cheeky enough to attack a cruise ship," Wendy Armitage, of Wellington, New Zealand, told The Associated Press shortly after disembarking the ship for a daylong port stop in the Omani capital of Muscat.

"It was very minor really," she said of the attack that lasted about five minutes. "But it was a surprise that they attacked us, and they did fire shots."

Separately, pirates freed a hijacked Yemeni cargo ship and its eight crew members without receiving any ransom.